Sand – The Struggle is Real

by: Andy Fish, PGA Professional The summer before my freshman year in high school I was playing golf with a couple buddies. On the third hole, I chunked a chip and smashed my club into the dry July ground. I looked down and saw the head of my sand wedge laying on the ground. I felt sick. A few months before, my family gave me this set of clubs for my birthday. We were living with my grandparents, my mothers parents, since my Mom and Dad split up the previous Fall. Mom was on the couch of our small upstairs apartment. I sat down next to her and told her what happened. She paused for a moment, then told me she thought this was a great lesson in self control. The sand wedge would not be fixed. I tried to explain that the sand wedge was a very important club, specialized to the point of only being less important than the Putter and Driver. I wanted to find a way out of this mess, but my hormonal adolescence was giving way to a sliver of maturity and I accepted that this was my problem. Over the next few weeks I practiced with every club in my bag, trying to cover the gap in my set. I worked on a bump and run with a seven iron which developed into a decent shot around the green. It worked well from the light ruff, fairway and collar. I opened my pitching wedge to hit higher softer shots. I was encouraged with my progress and my guilt was quickly replaced with a...

Promoting Health and Wellness in the Workplace

by: Dan Karrels, Personal Trainer & Certified Athletic Trainer Tips for an Improved Diet with a Busy Schedule Today’s society never fails to keep us on the go. So, it shouldn’t be surprising that the majority of people in the US eat out at least 3 to 4 times a week. Aside from the dent that this puts in our wallets, many people fail to recognize the detrimental affects this can have on their nutrition and overall health. Whether it’s eating out too much, or not realizing you haven’t eaten all day, our health takes a major hit when our nutrition consistently stumbles. We all know this, but unfortunately for many people it takes a good wake up call (or three) to really start making the necessary changes.  Many companies provide, or have the ability to provide convenient options for meals for their employees. Unfortunately, a good portion of the meals provided are not considered healthy, but it’s convenient and is seen as a “benefit” to employees. Whether it’s the company providing this, or you’re spending your own money on this, it’s time we all make a change. Don’t just say you are going to change or eat healthier; you must have a plan, and this time no excuses. Use some of these pointers to help keep you on a healthier eating schedule during your busy week. Breakfast Forget the daily doughnut party at work, I know, I’m sorry. Skip your morning Starbucks, Kwik Trip, or McDonalds stop. Find healthier options that can be prepared the night before or quickly in the morning. Maybe see if your company can...

5 Simple Exercises to do at Work for Posture

Chin Tucks Seated Angels – front view Seated Angles – side view Doorway Pec Stretch – with side view Standing Hamstring Stretch – with optional lean in Doorway Hip Extension by: Dan Karrels, Personal Trainer & Certified Athletic Trainer Chin Tucks Sit up straight with good posture and relax your shoulders. Keeping the shoulders relaxed pull your chin straight back like you are giving yourself a double chin. Your eyes should continue facing straight forwards and should not tilt downwards or upwards. Seated Angels Sit straight up with good posture and bend your elbows at your sides to 90 degrees with your palms facing up in front of you. Maintain good posture and relaxed neck/shoulders while rotating your arms to bring your hands out to your side. Make sure to brace your core so you do not arch your back while doing this.  Doorway Pec Stretch In a doorway, place your elbows on the doorframe at shoulder height or slightly lower and rest your hands on the doorframe above your elbows. While keeping your shoulders relaxed and down, slowly step through the doorway until you feel a gently stretch through your chest and front of your shoulders. Make sure you are keeping the shoulders anchored down and you are not over arching your back.  Standing Hamstring Stretch Place your foot with the toe up on your chair or desk with your leg locked out straight. The height should allow you to still stand up perfectly straight with the foot you are standing on facing straight at well and not turned out. If you do not feel a stretch at...

5 Skills for Overcoming Fear and Anxiety on the Golf Course

By: Andy Fish, PGA Professional Our brains react to things that are frightening. It’s a valuable trait for avoiding danger and staying alive. Unfortunately, our brains don’t have much nuance in this area and we react similarly to situations that are unfamiliar or uncomfortable. As a freshmen in high school, I had a fear of teeing off over water.  I was playing in a sectional golf tournament at an unfamiliar course and one of the holes by the clubhouse was a par three with an island tee box and a green on a small peninsula. My anxiety elevated through the round until I got to that hole. So, of course, I hit three shots into the water before I got a ball on dry ground. First tee jitters, the final holes of your best round and 2 foot putts can all constitute a stimulus for anxiety. They’re not dangerous, but your brain knows it doesn’t like the situation. Your palms sweat, breathing shallows and you might get quick with your actions and decisions. It’s very difficult to play in this state, so let’s fix it and look at some ways to overcome fear and anxiety on the links. Get familiar with the situation It’s simple, practice in the situation that brings you fear. A few years ago a student of mine had trouble with one hole on the course she played. It was a par 3 over water (sound familiar?). We walked out to the demonic par 3 with a bag of golf balls. One mission, slay the beast. Kristi hit many of the balls into the water at...